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Chocolate, Politics and Peace-Building


Chocolate, Politics and Peace-Building

An Ethnography of the Peace Community of San José de Apartadó, Colombia
Studies of the Americas

von: Gwen Burnyeat

119,99 €

Verlag: Palgrave Macmillan
Format: PDF
Veröffentl.: 08.01.2018
ISBN/EAN: 9783319514789
Sprache: englisch

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Beschreibungen

This book tells the story of the Peace Community of San José de Apartadó, an emblematic grassroots social movement of peasant farmers, who unusually declared themselves ‘neutral’ to Colombia’s internal armed conflict, in the north-west region of Urabá. It reveals two core narratives in the Community’s collective identity, which Burnyeat calls the ‘radical’ and the ‘organic’ narratives. These refer to the historically-constituted interpretative frameworks according to which they perceive respectively the Colombian state, and their relationship with their natural and social environments. Together, these two narratives form an ‘Alternative Community’ collective identity, comprising a distinctive conception of grassroots peace-building. This study, centered on the Community’s socio-economic cacao-farming project, offers an innovative way of approaching victims’ organizations and social movements through critical, post-modern politics and anthropology. It will become essential reading to Latin American ethnographers and historians, and all interested in conflict resolution and transitional justice.
1. Introduction: The Chocolate-Politics ContinuumPart I: Origins2. The Roots: Of Cooperatives and Conflict3. The Founding of the Peace Community4. The Cultural Change of 'Organisation'Part II: The Radical Narrative5. The Genealogy of the Rupture 1997-20056. Differentiating between Santos and UribePart III: The Organic Narrative7. Practices of Production8. The Elements of the Organic Narrative9. Conclusion: An 'Alternative Community' as Positive Peace-Building?
Gwen Burnyeat is a Wolfson PhD Scholar in Anthropology at University College London, UK. She has worked in Colombia for eight years, has a Masters from the Universidad Nacional de Colombia where she also lectured in Political Anthropology, and her prize-winning documentary ‘Chocolate of Peace’ was released in 2016 (www.chocolateofpeace.com). 
This book examines the Peace Community of San José de Apartadó, in the conflict zone of Urabá, Colombia, from the perspective of critical, post-modern politics and anthropology. Telling the story of an emblematic grassroots social movement, it reveals hitherto unseen socio-economic dimensions to national political struggles. Proposing a methodology of ethnographic con-textualisation, the book reveals two narratives which co-exist in the Community’s collective identity: a ‘radical narrative’ constituted via their ‘rupture’ with the state, creating an internal logic through which they interpret politics; and an ‘organic narrative’ shaped by their relationship to the environment and their organisational processes, associated with a concept of ‘alternative’ community. This study, centred on cacao and the Community’s socio-economic project, offers an innovative way of looking at victim organisations and grassroots social movements. It will become essential reading not only to Latin American ethnographers and historians, but to all interested in conflict resolution and transitional justice.Gwen Burnyeat is a Wolfson PhD Scholar reading Anthropology at University College London, UK. She has worked in Colombia for seven years, has a Masters from the Universidad Nacional de Colombia where she also lectured in Political Anthropology, and her prize-winning ethnographic documentary ‘Chocolate of Peace’ was released in 2016 (www.chocolateofpeace.com). 
Provides a fresh perspective on a grassroots community that has been both glorified and condemned by human rights activists and academiaFocuses on an area that has experienced extreme levels of violence - over 60 years of war, where a number of different peace-building initiatives have failed to produce desired resultsSpeaks through the voice of someone who is closely familiar with this community, the author having done extensive field research there, focusing on the socio-political reality on the ground and the creative coping mechanisms that different communities have developed 
Provides a fresh perspective on a grassroots community that has been both glorified and condemned by human rights activists and academiaFocuses on an area that has experienced extreme levels of violence - over 60 years of war, where a number of different peace-building initiatives have failed to produce desired resultsSpeaks through the voice of someone who is closely familiar with this community, the author having done extensive field research there, focusing on the socio-political reality on the ground and the creative coping mechanisms that different communities have developed 
“Wonderfully insightful and spiritually uplifting, this beautifully written book tells the amazing story of a Colombian rural community that, against all odds, has been able to carve out an autonomous space of peace in the midst of paramilitary, state, and guerrilla violations. Conceptually sophisticated and based on long-term ethnographic research, it evokes a better future for us all in these dark times.” (Michael Taussig, Class of 1933 Professor, Columbia University, USA)“This is ethnography at its best. A non-extractive, participatory accompaniment of an extraordinary community, revealing the everyday costs and creativity behind the many struggles for peace in Colombia and their relationship to the formal peace process in Havana.” (Jenny Pearce, Latin America and Caribbean Centre, London School of Economics, UK)

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